Revlon

In their move from North Point to Tsim Sha Tsui, Revlon selected space with a wonderful harbour view. Even from outside the main entrance, visitors can see directly through the office to Hong Kong Island and the famous skyline of Central District, while in the foreground, ships can be monitored as they come into, or depart from, nearby Ocean Terminal.

Upon arrival, there's no mistaking the fact that one has reached the new home of this giant of the cosmetics industry.

The interior design makes liberal use of Revlon marketing materials and retail displays - since the new office is also used for training purposes. Warm lighting, timber veneers and a swirly carpet pattern complete the effect. This is unmistakably Revlon territory.

A breakout space makes the connection between the front-of-house and the private offices/open-plan work area, which, combined, occupy most of the available space. The Cafe incorporates clean, Scandinavian-style furniture and highly decorative wall tiles, in contrast to the more corporate/retail look of the meeting rooms and elsewhere.

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In their move from North Point to Tsim Sha Tsui, Revlon selected space with a wonderful harbour view. Even from outside the main entrance, visitors can see directly through the office to Hong Kong Island and the famous skyline of Central District, while in the foreground, ships can be monitored as they come into, or depart from, nearby Ocean Terminal.

Upon arrival, there's no mistaking the fact that one has reached the new home of this giant of the cosmetics industry.

The interior design makes liberal use of Revlon marketing materials and retail displays - since the new office is also used for training purposes. Warm lighting, timber veneers and a swirly carpet pattern complete the effect. This is unmistakably Revlon territory.

A breakout space makes the connection between the front-of-house and the private offices/open-plan work area, which, combined, occupy most of the available space. The Cafe incorporates clean, Scandinavian-style furniture and highly decorative wall tiles, in contrast to the more corporate/retail look of the meeting rooms and elsewhere.