Djapa

Djapa is a Brazilian-Japanese ground and first floor bar and restaurant located along Lee Tung Avenue in Wanchai. Both in design as well as the food and beverage service, it is a fusion of the two seemingly disparate cultures. Brazil though, is home to the world’s largest overseas Japanese community with the first settlers arriving in the early 1900s. 

The core design theme, strongly expressed in the interior surfaces and furnishings, borrows from the imagery of Favela: shanty towns that have grown around the major cities of Brazil, where vivid colours and graffiti adorn the raw concrete, steel sheet, timber boarding and block structures from which they are built.

Wall surfaces in Djapa draw from this palette of rough finishes either as the original concrete or applied recycled materials, left either unfinished or with spray and hand brush graffiti. As if layered on top, contemporary Japanese art, principally from the anime genre, hangs on either bare or graffiti daubed walls. Sculptural pieces occupy prominent locations on both floors with other cultural references strewn about: sake barrels as table stools and an impressive array of Yamasaki whisky on the cracked antique mirrored back bar.

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Djapa is a Brazilian-Japanese ground and first floor bar and restaurant located along Lee Tung Avenue in Wanchai. Both in design as well as the food and beverage service, it is a fusion of the two seemingly disparate cultures. Brazil though, is home to the world’s largest overseas Japanese community with the first settlers arriving in the early 1900s. 

The core design theme, strongly expressed in the interior surfaces and furnishings, borrows from the imagery of Favela: shanty towns that have grown around the major cities of Brazil, where vivid colours and graffiti adorn the raw concrete, steel sheet, timber boarding and block structures from which they are built.

Wall surfaces in Djapa draw from this palette of rough finishes either as the original concrete or applied recycled materials, left either unfinished or with spray and hand brush graffiti. As if layered on top, contemporary Japanese art, principally from the anime genre, hangs on either bare or graffiti daubed walls. Sculptural pieces occupy prominent locations on both floors with other cultural references strewn about: sake barrels as table stools and an impressive array of Yamasaki whisky on the cracked antique mirrored back bar.